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Don’t Think Your All Alone!

Not going to be a long post today, just a quick note to help some of my friends out there feel better about their gardening skills.  I just wanted to set some minds at ease.  To those of you who have old yews, rhodies, or other evergreens that don’t appear to have survived the winter, YOU ARE NOT THE ONLY ONES!  I talked in the fall about the importance of watering in the winter months when possible and here is the proof of it’s necessity.  Many, many of you have serious damage to old, established evergreens which you have never given any special care before during the winter.  My point is you’ve been lucky till now, LOL!

ImageNow don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying I told you so, (but I did tell you so).  I’m just saying that many of you have recently become Mother Nature’s latest victims.  Your evergreens have been assaulted with winter burn due to lack of moisture during the long dry months and crazy temps.  And sadly, there is a very high probability that all your precious plants have “shuffled off their barky coil”.  Many rhodies out there look just like the sad little guy in the picture.  And even his distinguished big brothers and sisters look quite similar.  Many coniferous shrubs do appear to still have a spark of life in them, but will they ever fully recover is very difficult to predict.

 

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As you can see from this photo, their does still appear to be a glimmer of hope here, albeit very slight.  In this case, the best recommendation I have is that you immediately begin DEEP watering and get some good evergreen fertilizer or one with a high nitrogen content (the first of the 3 numbers listed on the package) according to the fertilizer instruction.

I would throw out there, that I don’t suggest trimming plants or worse than that, replacing them, until your certain they are not going to recover.  I know it can be tough to except since they tend to be unattractive while injured, but give them the summer to recover and if you still don’t see and results, then replace them either that fall or spring of the next season.  That being said if a coniferous evergreen completely drops its needles, it is NOT likely to recover.

Now, another family of plants that seems to have taken a massive hit this winter is roses.  However, I would certainly like to reassure you; just because all the old canes on your rose are grey and break easily, the plant is certainly NOT deceased.  Many roses will die back to the ground during difficult winters.  Then they will produce new shoots far down on old canes or even directly up from the ground off of old healthy root systems.  After you begin to see the new shoots feel free to trim back the old canes.  Again though, your going to want to feed with a good fertilizer (either a balanced mix or one specifically designed for your particular species of rose.) And of course, get the poor little guy some water!

Anyway, that’s all I’ve got today.  Like I said, I just wanted you to know that your not alone.  And as always, GOOD LUCK AND KEEP GROWING!!!

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Caring for your Evergreens during the winter months.

Even these young Columnar White Pines will need some "lovin" during the winter months.

Even these young Columnar White Pines will need some “lovin” during the winter months.

Well, according to Weather.com our days of 60 degree temps are coming to a close here in the Omaha area.  It appears the average daily high for the month of November will be just under 48 degrees (F).  This means its high time you prepare your evergreens for winter. You should make sure to give all your evergreens a good deep watering prior to the ground freezing.  As a general rule plants need about 10 gallons of water for every inch of caliper (so a 2 inch caliper tree would need about 20 gallons of water) Caliper is the width of the tree trunk about 12″ from the ground (unless it’s a large, established tree, then it is done at chest height).  If your hand watering with just a hose a good rule of thumb is about 5 minutes at medium pressure equals about 10 gallons of water.  Thus if we water our 2″ tree for 20 minutes at medium pressure it should be getting a good drink. Plants “sweat” just like humans do.  This primarily occurs through the leaf structure.  With evergreens this would be the needles, which they don’t lose like your other plants.  This opens the door to a problem known as Winter Burn.  They are “sweating” but the ground is frozen so they aren’t able to take up water through the roots.  Don’t think that just because there is snow on the ground that the plant is getting water.  If the ground is frozen so is the moisture.  To counter this we us a chemical called an ANTI DESICCANT.  The best way to describe this is that it acts as a wax to coat the evergreens needles or leaves to help slow the “sweating” during periods when little or no water is available (although it is not actually a wax).   The best time to apply anti desiccant is when the temps are starting to stay below 50 degrees during mid-day.  However you want to make sure there is no threat of rain or frost within 24 hours (the chemical may not fully adhere).  The other thing to keep in mind is that warm temps can “melt” the chemical off as well, so you may need to re-apply later in the season to maintain protection.  It’s not difficult, you simply spray onto the plant to the point of runoff.  This should help keep your plant from losing water when none is available to replenish it. Keep in mind that even if it is “winter” if we don’t have temps below freezing and still aren’t getting any moisture, you’re going to NEED TO GIVE YOUR PLANTS A DRINK!  Don’t just forget about them because your sprinkler system is off and you don’t feel like dragging a hose.  This could be a costly decision.  Also, DON’T FORGET YOUR BROADLEAF EVERGREENS!  Not all evergreens have needles (and not all needle tree’s are evergreens for that matter).  Plants like Boxwood, Yew, Rhododendron and Holly are especially susceptible to winter burn and should be treated as well. An added bonus of your anti desiccant is that you can even use it on your Holiday Cut Greens such as live wreaths or table center pieces to help them last longer as well.  Even your “live” Christmas tree would benefit greatly from a good coating.  Although I would hope that the folks you purchase the tree from took care of this for you.  Might be a good thing to ask when deciding who to purchase your tree from. GOOD LUCK AND KEEP GROWING!!